DUKE ELLINGTON SOCIETY OF SWEDEN

Ämnen i inlägg

Carnegie Hall 1947, 1st concert, part 4

Bildresultat för carnegie Hall

Inside Carnegie Hall

Al Hibbler sings It Don’t Mean A Thing

This is the fourth and last part from DESS with music from the Carnegie Hall concert in NYC on December 26, 1947. The last we heard in our previous posting was the Theme Medley which was played right after the Liberian Suite . This was followed by a speech by a representative of the Liberian government, which we have chosen to omit. Hence we start with Stomp, Look And Listen, a number quite frequently played between the years 1943 and 1956, thereafter to disappear from the repertoire.
(mer…)

Carnegie Hall 1947, 1st concert, part 3

Bildresultat för Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall by night

Dance No 3 (Liberian Suite)

The third part from the Carnegie Hall concert on December 26, 1947 introduces the Liberian Suite, an extended work, commemorating the establishment of the first independent African republic a century earlier. Ellington had been commissioned by the Liberian gouvernement to write this piece of music for the 100th anniversary celebrations. The suite consists of six parts: I Like The Sunrise and Dances no 1-5. It had been recorded a couple of days before for Columbia. According to available information it was recorded three times only, the performance on December 27, being the third one. (mer…)

Carnegie Hall 1947, 1st concert, part 2

Bildresultat för Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall today

New York City Blues

Here comes the second part of the concert att Carnegie Hall on December 26, 1947. The show continues with On A Turquoise Cloud with Kay Davis in the main role, assisted by Jimmy Hamilton and Tyree Glenn on clarinet and trombone respectively, creating an unforgettable sound. Johnny Hodges is next heard on Johnny Hodges Medley, which include Wanderlust, Junior Hop, Jeep’s Blues, The Jeep Is Jumpin’ and Mood To Be Wooed, all numbers that are closely associated with Hodges. (mer…)

Carnegie Hall 1947, 1st concert

Bildresultat för Ellington in Carnegie Hall 1947

Carnegie Hall

 

In the Goodies Room, you will find the first 40 minutes from Duke Ellington’s 1947 Carnegie Hall concert. This is the first part of the first concert which took place on December 26, 1947. The second concert which is dated December 27 has been issued on Prestige P-24075, whereas the 1st concert has remained unissued.

Billy Strayhorn’s Midriff

The concert had been planned for two consecutive nights at Carnegie Hall, 26 & 27 December 1947. The songs presented here  are:

*Star Spangled Banner*Snibor (AKA The New Look)*Blue Serge*Midriff*Triple Play*He Makes Me Believe He’s Mine*Harlem Air Shaft* Mella Brava and* Kickapoo Joy Juice. (mer…)

The DESS Bulletin – New Issue

The indefatigable editor of the DESS Bulletin, Bo Haufman, has produced a new issue. It is the 2019-2 one and it is on its way to the DESS members.

The trumpeter Harold Baker – nicknamed ”Shorty” – is the featured artist in the new issue.

Thomas Eriksson covers his life and career in a five page article. The focus is of course on his time in the Ellington band but the readers with also learn about his time with the big bands of Don Redman, Teddy Wilson and Andy Kirk before Baker joined Ellington in 1942. His time and marriage with Mary Lou Williams is also well covered as are his periods as freelancer.

A second Baker article in the new Bulletin is a reprint from Jazz Journal, in which Clark Terry tells Steven Voce about him. ”There was never a better trumpet player to come out of St. Louis than Harold ”Shorty Baker”, he says.

Another major article in the new Bulletin is about Al Sears. It is written by Nigel Haslewood, an Englishman living in Leicester, UK who runs the online Sadman Record shop.

It is the first part of an article, which was originally published in the IAJRC Journal. Like Thomas Eriksson’s article on Harold Baker, it is very well researched and very detailed. When the second part is also published, the DESS members should have a good monography on Al Sears.

This issue also have some shorter articles by Bo Haufman himself like one about The Women’s Duke Ellington and another on the Ellington-Strayhorn composition The Eighth Veil.

The DESS member Erling Torkelsson have also contributed to the new Bulletin with an article about Jerome Kern, George Gershwin and Duke Ellington.

 

 

 

Towne Casino, Cleveland, September 1952

town-casino-marquee2.jpg

The Towne Casino was a local jazz bar situated in Cleveland. During its short years of existence (1951-53) it featured many great musicians such as Duke Ellington, JJ Johnson, Sarah Vaughan and Coleman Hawkins. The club (like some other similar venues) suffered bomb attacks, thought to be racially motivated, and therfore hade to close down its activity on August 1, 1953.

Betty Roché sings All Of Me

Duke Ellington and His Orchestra played at the Towne Casino for a week (17 -25 September) in 1952. As far as known this was the only occasion Duke and his men played there. The New Desor has one session dated September 1952, from a local broadcast and numbered DE5217a-d, and furthermore, Amazon offers an on demand produced CD-R which is dated 17 September 1952 (Link:https://www.amazon.com/Duke-Cleveland-1952-Ellington/dp/B01LTHY7ME). The latter is likewise from a broadcast, but not to be found in the New Desor. You’ll find both recordings in the Goodies Room. (mer…)

Wolfram Knauer on BB&B

Wolfram Knauer, Director of the Jazzinstutut Darmstadt, did his first appearance at an Ellington Study Group Conference in Copenhagen in 1992.

He had chosen to talk about Simulated Improvisation in Black, Brown and Beige. The presentation built on an article Dr. Knauer had published in the journal The Black Perspective in Music in 1990.

In a 1986 article, André Hodier used the term ”simulated improvisation” to described an element in his compositions from the 1950s and Knauer considers that Ellington’s Black Brown and Beige is an early example of a comparable technique.

He gives several examples of this from the first part of the suite but starts his talk with some background on BB&B.

To help the audience to follow the presentation, Dr. Knauer had prepared a two-page handout, which is available here.

It is very good to have it at hand when listening to the talk.

.

 

 

%d bloggare gillar detta: