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DR Ellington Broadcasts (21)

The third ”goodie” for January is program 21 in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. The broadcast is available in the ”Goodies” section of the website.

The program was broadcasted on June 14, 1985 and the announcer is Bjarne Busk

The program is focused on ”stockpile” recordings. It starts with a selection from one in February 1957.

It is a little bit unusual since Ellington added a choir to the band in some of the tunes recorded. We hear ”Take The ‘A’ Train” and ”Perdido” in this format. Paul Gonsalves was quite featured in this recording session and the broadcasts let us hear an unusual version of ”Moon Mist” with Gonsalves as soloist.

The broadcast then continues with the ”stockpile” session, from March 19, 1956. Selections from this session have been included in earlier broadcasts. This time we hear ”Miss Lucy” and ”Prelude To A Kiss” with the full band with solos by Ray Nance and Johnny Hodges respectively.

Next, the broadcast moves to the July 18, 1963 ”stockpile” session. Busk has selected an untitled blues for the listeners. In NDESOR and other discographies it is called ”July 18th Blues”.

Finally, the broadcast ends with two selections from the stockpile session of June 6, 1962 – ”Cottontail” with Jimmy Hamilton as soloist and ”Taffy Twist” with Ray Nance and – once again – Jimmy Hamilton soloing.

”Taffy Twist” is a Mercer Ellington composition and in the broadcast he tells how it became included in ”The River” ballet suite. Earlier in the broadcast, Mercer had talked about the relationship between Ellington and Paul Gonsalves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DR Ellington Broadcasts – Program 20

The second ”goodie” for December is program 20 in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. The broadcast is available in the ”Goodies” section of the website.

The program was broadcasted on June 7, 1985.

The program starts with music recorded for the English theatre play ”The Jay Walker”. After a short excerpt of ”The Queen” and a part of a CBC interview from 1967 in which Ellington tells how he came to write the music for the play, we hear ”Mac” which is the musical charactarization of the main character in the play also called Mac. Ellington later reused this piece in his Second Sacred Concert as ”TGTT”.

The ”The Jay Walker” part of the broadcast ends with ”Policia” (take 1) and an untitled blues which was never used in the play. In the Ellington discographies it appears as Blues no. 16

Next in the program comes stockpile music recorded on the same date (April 14, 1965) as some of the songs for the ”Concert in Virgin Island” album. We hear ”Rod la Roque” (take 4), ”Love Scene” (take 2) and Rhythm Section Blues (aka ”Big Fat Alice’s Blues) (take 1). All three have been issued in the Private Collection series (vol. 8).

The broadcast ends with three selections from the June 15, 1970 stockpile session – ”Hard” (aka ”Mendoza”) (take , ”Ballad” (aka ”Mixt”) (take 24) and ”Just A-Settin’ And A-Rockin'” (take 42). This session also produced some of the movements for ”The River”.

 

 

 

 

DR Ellington Broadcasts – Program 19

The first ”goodie” for November is program 19 in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. The broadcast is available in the ”Goodies” section of the website.

The program was broadcasted on May 31 1985.

It brings the listeners excerpts from two ”stockpile” recording sessions – one on July 25, 1962 and the other on April 4, 1967. All the selections in the program was later issued in the ”Private Sessions” series.

The program starts with three tunes from the 1967 session – ”Eggo”, ”Amta” and ”Little Purple Flower” (aka ”The F.L.”). Eggo is mistakenly announced as ”KIXX” (aka ”Traffic Jam” or ”The Biggest”) but it was recorded just before ”Eggo”.

The 1962 session is the Ellington Orchestra without the trumpet section and in the second part of the session also Johnny Hodges and Harry Carney are out.

This part of the DR broadcast is a gem for fans of Paul Gonsalves. He is the featured soloist in all the numbers. We get the opportunity to hear him demonstrate his skills in different tempi but in particular in slow ones.

First we hear him in a number called ”No. 1” but known in discographies as ”Blue Too”; then comes No. 2 – aka ”Tune Up” which is followed by ”Tigress” and ”Telstar” (aka ”Tigress”).

The broadcast ends with ”Like Late” and three Ellington compositions – ”Major”, ”Minor” and ”G” (aka ”G” for Groove”).

 

 

 

 

 

DR Ellington Broadcasts – Program 18

The fourth ”goodie” for September is program 18 in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s.

As usual, it is available in the ”Goodies of the Month” section of the DESS Lobby (DESS-rummet).

The program was broadcasted on March 29, 1985 and the presenter is Erik Wiedeman. It is – like the broadcast on March 22, 1985 – entirely devoted to the music of the ballett ”The River”. Together, the two programs includes all the movements of ”The River” in different stages of development.

The program starts with the piano version of ”The River” from May 25, 1970. It is followed by ”The Meander” – also a piano version – from May 11, 1970. It was meant to be played in Program 17 but because of a mix-up ”The Lake” was played instead. ”The Meander” is the third movement

The orchestral version of ”The Lake” (May 25, 1970) comes next. It is the fifth movement of the suite.

(mer…)

DR Ellington Broadcasts – Program 17

The third ”goodie” for September is program 17 in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s.

As usual, it is available in the ”Goodies of the Month” section of the DESS Lobby (DESS-rummet).

The program was broadcasted on March 22, 1985 and the presenter is Erik Wiedeman.

It is – like the following broadcast on March 29, 1985 – entirely devoted to the music of the ballett ”The River”. There will be a separate article about this ballett on the website in November.

Wiedeman has chosen the music to make it possible to follow how the music for the different scenes (or movements) were developed by Ellington. The program gives (or was meant to give) both piano versions and full orchestral versions of the music for three of the scenes of the ballett.

The broadcast starts with the orchestral version of ”The Giggling Rapids” (aka ”Grap”) recorded on June 3, 1973. It is the fourth movement of the suite.

It then moves on to two piano versions of ”The River”. The first one recorded on May 11 has an extra piano line dubbed in. It is kept also in the second version recorded two weeks later when Joe Benjamin, bass was added. ”The River” is the opening and closing movement of the suite.

(mer…)

Danish Radio Ellington Broadcasts – Program 16

The 16th program in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s based on the Mercer Ellington donation is the second ”Goodie” for May.

As usual, it is available in the ”Goodies of the Month” section of the DESS Lobby (DESS-rummet).

The program was broadcasted on March 15, 1985.

The broadcast is  comprised of excerpts from Ellington’s 1964 Carnegie Hall concert. It took place on March 29, 1964 just after he had returned from his five week-long tour of Europe. The program of the concert was more or less the same as the one of the European concerts.

It starts with four selections from ”Impressions from the Far East” (later to be known as ”Far East Suite”) – Amad, Agra, Bluebird of Delhi and Isfahan. Johnny Hodges, who is the featured soloist in Isfahan, continues in this role in Things Ain’t What They Used To and The Banquet Scene  from ”Timons of Athen”. Next in the broadcast comes another part of the suite  –Skillipoop – in which Jimmy Hamilton and Sam Woodyard are at the forefront.

The broadcast ends with three well-known concert numbers – Monologue (Pretty and the Wolf), Jam With Sam and Jones. They were also the final numbers in the Carnegie Hall Concert.

The full Carnegie Hall concert has been issued on CD by the Italian labels Jazz Up and Moon.

Danish Radio Ellington Broadcasts – Program 15

The 15th program in the Duke Ellington series broadcasted by the Danish Radio in the mid-1980s based on the Mercer Ellington donation is the third ”Goodie” for April.

As usual, it is available in the ”Goodies of the Month” section of the DESS Lobby (DESS-rummet).

The program was broadcasted on March 8, 1985.

It is a set of stockpile recordings from April 1963 and November 1968 done by a subset of the Ellington orchestra. It was composed of the sax and rhythm sections plus one or two horns. The songs played are some well-known ones in new interpretations and some rarely heard or never recorded before.

The broadcast starts with two numbers from April 17, 1963 – ”Jeep’s Blues” and the Johnny Hodges composition ”Got Nobody Now”. Both are solo numbers for Ray Nance. It is the only appearance of ”Got Nobody Now” in the Ellington discography.

Next comes three songs recorded the day after. Two of them – ”Butter And Oleo” and ”Blousons Noirs” – were only recorded on this occasion and as regards the third one – Blue Rose – it was the last time it was put on tape. Ray Nance is once again featured prominently but also Johnny Hodges gets some good solo space and in ”Butter and Oleo” every member of the sax section except Harry Carney has a solo.

The second part of the broadcast gives us some of the songs recorded on November 29, 1968. It starts with ”KNUF” which of course can be read as ”FUNK”. Johnny Hodges with good support from Buster Cooper and Willie Cook is at the forefront of this Ellington tune never heard before or after the session. Then the broadcast continues with three well-known Ellington songs – Just Squeeze Me, Mood Indigo and In A Sentimental Mood – but played as never heard before.

”Just Squeeze Me” belongs to Harold Ashby, ”Mood Indigo” to in particular Harry Carney and ”In A Sentimental Mood” to

The broadcast ends with a swinging blues credited to Ellington, ”Waiting For You”. Like KNUF, the session is its only appearance in the Ellington discographies.

All the music in the program has been issued on CD, originally in the ”Private Collection” series.

 

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