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Ellington News-Nyheter Jan. 2022

I used to call this type of articles “Smått och gott / Bits and Pieces” but I think “Ellington News-Nyheter” is more relevant and I will call them this from now on.

DESS Bulletin 2022-1

The new issue offers – as usual – a lot of interesting reading both in Swedish and in English.

This time, the major article is about Lil Greenwood – “Duke’s Blues Belter” – who sung with the Ellington band for 30 months in the late 50’s and early 60’s.

This seven-page piece is written by DESS member Sven-Erik Baun Christensen and it gives the reader everything there is to know about Greenwood. He writes about her early career as gospel and R&B singer, her early records, her meeting and 30 months with the Ellington Orchestra and her years and appearances on the West Cost thereafter.

It is obvious that Sven-Erik has an affection for her and would like the Ellington community to learn more about her than what one finds in Ellington discographies.

In his view, her main contribution during the two and a half years with Ellington “was to bring to the band a new vocal earthiness, based in her gospel and blues background, that aroused the band and exited audiences”… “The studio recording of Walkin’ and Singin’ the Blues and the best of the concert performances released in later years are evidence that she was worthy of the distinction of being, if only for a short period, Duke Ellington’s female vocalist”.

The Bulletin has this time two more articles in English.

One is a reprint of an article in the souvenir program for Ellington’s 1958 European tour titled The Future of Jazz. It does not read like a true article written by Ellington but rather a text versioin of an interview. But who knows? Anyhow, it is interesting to read as are the comments by Bo Haufman.

The other is a contribution by Mike Zirpolo about Billy Strayhorn or more specifically about The Peaceful Side of Billy Strayhorn album. He tells how the album came about – Strayhorn was in Paris with Ellington for the Paris Blues film and one day a young American record producer approached him in a café about making a recording of his own compositions and Strayhorn said “Why not” and two days later the recording session took place – look closely into A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing.

The article originates from a blog post on Zirpolo’s blog Swing & Beyond.

In the issue, Bo Haufman himself has contributed two interesting articles in Swedish. One is about Ellington’s performances at Carnegie Hall and the other about the song Wanderlust which Hodges recorded with a small group on 20 December 1938.

It is most likely a Hodges composition but it is officially attributed to both Hodges and Ellington.  It also appears on Duke Ellington Meets Coleman Hawkins and the Pablo album Up in Duke’s Workshop. There is also a stockpile recording of the piece from 23 May 1969.

Blue Light Winter 2021-22

Whether it is the third issue for 2021 or the first for 2022 one can discuss, but in any case it is – as Blue Light’s new editor Gareth Evans has said – “a bumper issue”. It is expanded from the usual 22 pages to 30 pages and Evans has managed to use the extra space very well.

The new issue is dominated by two major articles, which take up almost half of the 30 pages.

The first one is Roger Boyes’ A Month At The Capitol. It is another one in his very valuable and impressive series on Ellington in the 1940’s. This time, he “looks at the Ellington Orchestra’s 1943 activities in the weeks following the 30 September Philadelphia concert and it follows straight on from Stability and Change in BL 28/2.”

In the first part of the article, Boyes deals with Ellington’s month-long engagement at the Capitol Theatre on Broadway and 51st Street in October 1943.

It was apparently a very succesful engagement both artistically and financially, which is detailed in the article.

Since Shorty Baker, Nar Jones and Junior Raglin were not members of New York’s Local 802 of the Musicians’ Union, Ellington had to use temporary stand-ins during the engagement. As a result, Otto Hardwicke came back to the orchestra and Dizzy Gillespie had a brief tenure in it. There were several stand-ins for Junior Raglin but Wilson Meyers seems to have done “over half” of the subbings.

As regards Gillespie, Boyes does not only state that “Dizzy Gillespie substitued for Shorty Baker” but uses the statement as the starting point for a mini essay on the impact of Gillespie’s four weeks with Ellington on himself and on the orchestra. There are many other examples in article of this style of essay writing and they makes it even more enjoyable to read it.

The article’s second part is devoted to Ellington’s recordings of transcriptions for World Broadcasting System. They took place in two sessions in November and in December. Boyes goes through them in detail and expands particularly on new soloists and new compositions. There will be reasons to come back to this.

The second major article – The Race for Space  – is written by Gareth Evans himself and is about Ellington recordings connected with the cosmic scene. The title is from an article Ellington presumably wrote  in late 1957 but which was never published. It is a kind of springboard for Evans’ look at seven Ellington/Strayhorn pieces with titles associated to space or cosmos.

The first five are from Colmbia 1957-1959 albums – Ballet of the Flying Saucers (A Drum is a Woman) , Spacemen (The Cosmic Scene), Launching Pad and Duel Fuel (Festival Session) and Blues In Orbit (Blues In Orbit). The sixth one is Telstar – a stock pile recording in 1962 and the last one Moon Maiden – the result of a commission from ABC-TV.

Evans has interesting things to say about all of them and it is refreshing to get the perspectives of a younger generation of Ellington experts. I don’t think I have seen Creedence Clearwater Revival, Pink Floyd and similar artists mentioned in articles about Ellington before. Or am I wrong?

The article is accompanied by a playlist on Spotify, which includes not only the Ellington recordings but also a recording of Peter Long’s reworking of Gustav Holst’s The Planet by the Echoes of Ellington Jazz Orchestra. A nice widening of perspectives!

Among other things in the new issue I particularly recommend Fred Glueckstein’s article about the relationship between Tony Bennett and the obituary on Charlie Watts. It was very good to learn that my image of the Rolling Stones’ drummer has been totally wrong all those years. Now I know better!

Tone Parallel

Ian Bradley published the second issue of Tone Parallel some weeks ago. It is available at https://toneparallel.substack.com/p/tone-parallel-5ad.

The issue is about singer, dancer, composer Ann Henry and her composition Pockets, the dedication of the new Alvar Aalto Library at Mount Angel Abbey, a Benedictine community, near Portland in Oregon in May 1970 and Duke Ellington’s appearance there with his orchestra.

Bradley wrote about this subject about two years on his blog Ellington Live  http://ellingtonlive.blogspot.com/2020/05/ but since then he has done a lot of work to find out more about Ann Henry and to improve the sound of the Vimeo video and the reel-to-reel tape which have the music from the event.

It seems fair to presume that Pockets: It’s Amazing When Love Goes On Parade was composed with the dedication of Alvar Aalto Library in mind but Bradley does not go into this, he rather focus on the work itself.

It is written in three movements. The first one is a waltz, the second one a march and the last one “meditative. Based on musical notation by Henry, Ron Collier did the orchestration and conducted the Ellington orchestra in the performance of the work on 29 May 1970. Henry herself sings the lyrical parts.

The Vimeo video with the first hour of the concert is an integral part of Bradley’s video together with an 8 minutes excerpt from a professionally restored sound track of the video and a clip from the reel-to-reel tape with Don’t Get Down On Your Knees To Pray Until You Have Forgiven Everyone sung by Tony Watkins. It is not clear if Bradley intends to share the full Ellington part with other Ellington collectors.

New DESS Bulletin has arrived

It is the last issue for 2021 and Bo Haufman has once again put together a lot of interesting reading about Ellington and those around him.

The cover story  is this time about Bubber Miley.

In a six pages long article, Göran Wallén demonstrates his deep knowledge about Miley – “Duke’s Inspirer”  – as he calls him.

The article is concentrated on Miley’s time before he joined the Washingtonians and after he forced out of the Ellington band but covers also Miley’s influence on and importance for Ellington’s “jungle” band and his stylistic development.

A part of the article also look into the famous January 16, 1929 recording session and recapitulate what the Swedish expert group on Miley’s recordings said about his participation in this session.

Another major and very interesting article is an interview with Fred Guy that the jazz and music journalist John McDonough published in Down Beat in 1969 and which is reprinted in the new Bulletin.

In the interview, Guy talks about how he come to work for Ellington, about the clubs where Ellington played, how he persuaded Harry Carney’s mother to allow him to join the band and his memories from the band. He also openenly express his dislike for Irving Mills.

In another interesting article, DESS board member Thomas Harne teaches the Bulletin readers about the difference between a cornet and a trumpet and the difference in sound between them.

There are also reviews of new Ellington records in the last issue for 2021 and two shorter drum related articles by Bo Haufman – The double bass drum concept and Duke’s drummer problems in 1966.

 

 

DESS Bulletin 2021-3

The fall issue of the DESS Bulletin should have arrived in the mailbox of DESS members by now.

As usual, it provides a lot of good reading contributed by Bulletin editor and DESS President, Bo Haufman and others.

The cover artist in the fall issue is Django Reinhardt – A Gypsy with a Song.

In a six-page article Bo Haufman gives a detailed account of the contacts between Django and Duke Ellington but also of other contacts between him and other American jazz musicians like Louis Armstrong and Rex Stewart. In particular, Bo gives a detailed account of Reinhardt’s appearances with Ellington during his October-November 1946 visit to the U.S.A.

A highly recommended article!

Another contribution by Bo is a three-page article about Ellington’s many failed efforts to establish himself on Broadway and have a musical performed there.

For those who did not attend the Zoom-based Ellinton 2021 Meeting, Bo’s summary of the event  is also good reading. All the presentations with the exception of three are also available to watch and listen to on the DESS website.

In the new issue, there is also an article by DESS-member Peter Lee about his favorite Johnny Hodges and a condensed version of an article by Mike Zirpolo on the Swing and Beyond website about Billy Strayhorn’s Clementine.

These major articles are supplemented by a lot of shorter ones like a reprint of an interview of Sonny Greer and tributes to Sven Tollin and Ted Hudson – two pillars in the Ellington community, who have left us.

The first DESS meeting since January 2020 is also announced in the Bulletin. It will take place on 13 September 2021 and starts with the Annual meeting. It is followed by Erik Persson talking about his view of Duke Ellington and musical entertainment by Jazz MaTazz.

 

New Issue of DESS Bulletin

The Spring Issue of the DESS Bulletin has arrived in the mailbox of DESS members.

As usual it is of interesting articles, most of them written by the energetic Bulletin editor and DESS President, Bo Haufman.

The cover artist in the new issue is Joya Sherrill.

In a five-page article, Haufman portraits The Ellington Songbird, as he calls her. He tells how the seventeen years old Sherrill came to join Ellington in the summer of 1942 (in July Sherrill says herself but according to TDWAW it was in August). It was a short stay of four months since she had to go back to school.

Two years later, she was back with Ellington but stayed only for 15 months because she was getting married.

However, she was one of Ellington’s favorite singers and he called her back on special occasions like for A Drum Is A Woman and My People. According to the article, she was offered to take part in The Sacred Concerts but she turned it down.

The article also covers Sherrill’s recording career with Ellington and on her own as well as her television career and participation in Ellington conferences.

Other articles by Bo Haufman’s in the Bulletin are among others “Duke Ellington och hans djungel”, Duke Ellington Swinging the classics”, “Check Webb oh Duke Ellington”.

Bo has also found time to write an article about Gerald Wilson based on “The Jazz Pilgrimage of Gerald Wilson, which was publsihed a couple of years ago.

In conclusion, another issue of the DESS Bulletin full of good reading.

 

Smått och gott / Bits And Pieces Jan 2021

DESS Bulletin 2021-1

The first issue of the DESS Bulletin for 2021 was sent to the DESS members yesterday. Its editor, Bo Haufman has produced another ambitious issue.

This time, the featured artist is trumpeter Louis Metcalf, who participated in recording sessions with the Ellington band in 1926 and 1927 and finally become a regular member of the orchestra for about a year in late 1927.

In a four-page article, Bo Haufman goes through Metcalf’s life and career with emphasis on his time with Ellington. It is supplemented by a reprint of an “Oral History” interview with Metcalf.

Another theme in the new issue of the DESS Bulletin is Harlem. It has two articles by Bo Haufman himself on the theme – one about the Ellington recordings of s music with Harlem in its name and another about Ellington’s composition The Sidewalks of New York.

A third theme is Ellington’s composition Sepia Panorama. There are two articles on this topic – one is by Mike Zirpolo and another quoted from Walter van de Leur’s presentation at the Ellington ’94 conference in Stockholm on the Ellington-Strayhorn collaboration.

In addition to these six articles, there are some more good reads in the new Bulletin. Just pick it up and find out about them yourself.

Blue Light Autumn 2020

The last issue of DESUK’s Blue Light for 2020 arrived a couple of weeks ago. It is quite research focused. The key article in this section is another impressive piece by Roger Boyes’ series on Ellington in the years of the Petrillo recording  ban.

It is titled Live At The Hurricane but it covers much more than the title indicate.

It starts with the aftermath to the Carnegie Hall concert on Jan. 23, 1943 and the ensuing road tour, continues with different aspects of the engagement from April 1, 1943 at the Hurricane Restaurant on the second floor of the Brill Building on 1619 Broadway at 49th Street and ends with discussing the famous Mutual Broadcasts from Hurricane in a wider context.

Another solid and interesting research-oriented article is Pedro Cravinho’s Jazz, Revue and a Thriller. The Response of the Birminham Press to Duke Ellington’s 1933 Tour.

It is developed from a presentation he gave at the 2018 Ellington conference in Birmingham. Because of the organisation of the conference in workshops, many participants were not able to listen to it so it is most welcome that a further developed version is published by Blue Light.

The last articles in the research part deals with the Lockdown Lowdown initiative, which provides weekly broadcasts with all sorts of people with knowledge and views on Ellington.

Finally, the new Blue Light has also an enjoyable article by Brian Priestly full of insights about Clark Terry on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth.

Youtube

The tireless YouTube observer Brian Koller has drawn the attention of the community of Ellington fans to this new Ellington sound-only video on YouTube. Thank you, Brian.

 

Winter Issue of DESS Bulletin

The new issue of the DESS Bulletin has been with its subscribers = the DESS members since a week now. Its is another very good job by its longtime editor och the DESS Chairman this year Bo Haufman.

The cover story is about Paul Gonsalves – the gentle giant in the Ellington band for more than 30 years.

He is portraited by Bo Haufman in a five-page article.

Bo admits that it is an immense topic and that Gonsalves is not his favorite tenor man. Despite this, he gives a very good and detailed  portrait of Gonsalves. It covers among other things his early career, his entrancer into the Ellington band and significant recordings with Ellington.

Bo considers that Gonsalves is at his best in ballads and slow numbers and his selection of recordings has a bias towards this.

His selection does not include I have Just Seen Her on the Columbia album All American In Jazz, which Gonsalves apparently considered as his best performance.

Bo’s article also covers Gonsalves’ many recordings with others and in this list he includes the album Boom-jacki-boom-chick, which he says, “should absolutely be included in a Gonsalves collection”.

The new issue also has a reprint of an interview of Gonsalves in Crescendo Magazin in 1964. In it, Gonsalves talks among other things about the influences when he developed his style. “Hawk was my main influence, then Ben Webster and Don Byas. ….. Other influences were Lester Young Chu Berry and even Bud Freeman.”

He also talks about his years in the Basie band – “they were a wonderful experience” – and about the Diminuendo and Crescendo in Blue effect. “After a few years … you don’t want to play it at all.” “Actually, what I really like to play  are ballads”, he said.

The reprint from Mike Zirpolo’s Swing and Beyond website is this time the article about Billy Strayhorn, Billy May and Chelsea Bridge that Zirpolo published in February 2017. It is about two boys from Pittsburgh, two very different careers and two interpretations of the same song. A highly recommended article.

For those, who would like to hear the music, go to the article at https://swingandbeyond.com/2017/02/11/chelsea-bridge-billy-and-billy-strayhorn-and-may/.

Besides these three articles, there is a lot more to read in the new issues of the DESS Bulletin, among it another two articles by Bo Haufman.

One is about Leonard Feather – The Golden Feather – and the other about the names of the two parts of The Beautiful Indians suite – Hiawatha and Minnehaha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DESS Bulletin 2020-3

Bo Haufman, the Bulletin editor and President of DESS,  has delighted the DESS members by sending out the autumn issue of the DESS Bulletin quite early this year. This allow them to digest and enjoy another Bulletin with a lot of good reading during the last weeks of the summer holiday.

This time the cover story is about Wellman Braud – Ellington’s first main bass player

In the well-researched four page lead article, Bo Haufman gives the full career of Braud.

He starts with his early years in Chicago (1917-1923), his two month visit to England in early 1923 as member of the Charles A. Elgar’s Orchestra to play in the show “Plantation Days” and his settlement in New York upon the return from England.

In New York, Braud got engaged by Wilbur Sweatman and also played in pit bands for musical comedies. He also also participated in his first recording sessions – two Victor sessions with Thomas Morris and his Seven Hot Babies on November 12 and 14, 1926.

In June 1927, Duke Ellington hired him as bass and tuba player and he became very quickly an important element in the Ellington orchestra. Braud stayed for almost eight years and left in March 1935.

In the article, Bo gives a detailed account of Braud’s period with the band. He talks about Braud’s style and role in the Ellington Orchestra, goes through Braud’s main recordings with the band and tells about the circumstances that led the Braudman’s departure.

The final part of the article gives snapshots of what Braud did after having left Ellington. He was not engaged by any other major orchestra but seems to have stayed in the environment of blues and music anchored in the New Orleans tradition.

At one point, he moved to California In 1955, he started to play with Kid Ory there and went with the Kid Ory’s Creole Jazz Band to Europe in 1956. In 1959, he started “a long lasting musical relationship” with the blues and folksinger Barbara Dane. Braudman accompanied her with a trio and did this also for blues artists performing at her club “Sugar Hill – Home of the Blues.

Braud passed away in Los Angeles in 1966.

But there is not only the article about Wellman Braud to read in the new issue of the DESS Bulletin but several others.. (more…)

Smått och gott / Bits and Pieces

New DESS Bulletin

The second 2020 issue of the DESS Bulletin was sent to the DESS members last week. It is an impressive piece of work by Bulletin’s editor Bo Haufman, who also is the new President of Duke Ellington Society of Sweden

The cover story is about Fred Guy – The Obscure Fred Guy as Bo Haufman headline his three page article about him. A highly recommended reading!

Another of Bo’s articles in the new issue is an encyclopedic one about Ellington songs with a reference to a dance style or similar. It is in Swedish but it might be worthwhile to have it translated into English to give DESS’ English-speaking members a chance to comment.

In another four-page article (also this in Swedish), Bo writes about the record companies with which Ellington was associated. Also this article is in Swedish.

The Royal Swedish Ballet performed Ellington’s and Alvin Allley’s ballet The River at the Royal Opera in Stockholm in 1993. Erik Wiedemann wrote the text for the program and it is reprinted in the new Bulletin issue. It is accompanied by what Ellington said about the River at the Grace Cathedral concert in San Francisco on April 16, 1970.

Another reprint is what George Avakian said to an interviewer in 1978 about his first meeting with Ellington when Avakian was 18 years old.

The article by Mike Zirpolo emanating from his website Swing & Beyond in this issue is titled Something To Live For. It deals principally with the start of Billy Strayhorn’s career with Ellington and Ellington’s recording of Something To Live For March 21, 1939. The article is supplemented by one of Bo Haufman about recordings of Strayhorn and others of the song. The two articles are in English.

Ellington 2020

Det nya numret av Bulletinen (se ovan) innehåller en heltäckande rapport om Ellington 2020 – konferensen som aldrig blev av. Här följer några korta tillägg och foton.

Allt tydde på att det skulle bli en bra konferens. Den var väl förberedd av musikprofessorn Anna Celenza som vi alla är skyldiga ett stort tack för hennes sätt att organisera konferensen och hantera krisen som ledde till att den ställdes in.

Den hade också ett tema som pekade framåt. Det tilltänkta programmet och en kortare sammanfattning av de planerade presentationerna finns på webbplatsen för konferensen – https://www.ellington2020.org/.

Men av allt som planerats blev det alltså nästan intet. När vi satte oss ner på den anrika jazzklubben Blues Alley i Georgetown på onsdagskvällen var konferensen reducerad till ett symposium med maximalt 35 tillresta deltagare och färre presentation än planerat. Ett par timmar senare var också detta inställt och för oss européer gällde det att snabbt boka om flygbiljetterna så att vi inte fastnade i USA på obestämd tid.

Konserten “A Tribute To Billy Strayhorn på Blues Alley med Washingtongruppen Marshall Keys and Soulful Path var således det enda av det ursprungliga programmet som genomfördes.

Det var intressant och stimulerande att höra Billy Strayhornlåtar i beboptolkningar men det utlöste många diskussioner mellan de tillresta Ellingtonexperterna. Stämningen var dock överlag god.

 

Besvikelsen över att konferensen inte blev av ens i ett miniformat var naturligtvis stor särskilt bland de som arbetat hårt med att förbereda presentationer. På torsdagsmorgonen när konferensen skulle ha invigts tog några av dem upp initiativet att samla oss andra runt ett bord och en bärbar dator i ett hörn av konferenslokalen för att visa upp vad de förberett. Bl. a. visade filmmannen och Ellingtonkännaren Joe Medjuk filmen The Duke som CBC TV producerade 1965 för sin serie Festival. En mycket intressant film. Senast den visades på en Ellingtonkonferens var den i Toronto 1986.

Kanske det kan bli möjligt att visa den på ett kommande DESS-möte?

Frågan är naturligtvis nu om det kommer att bli fler Ellingtonkonferenser. Det är tveksamt. Det krävs mycket arbete för att organisera en konferens och tillflödet av en ny generation av Ellingtonexperter är svagt. Kanske behövs det andra former och mindre krävande former än en stor konferens för att driva arbetet på att “Mapping Duke Ellington’s World” vidare.

New recording of Black, Brown and Beige

Some five years ago, Jazz At Lincoln Center launched its own record label Blue Engine Records.

On March 6, the label released  Wynton Marsalis’ first recording of the Black, Brown and Beige (https://wyntonmarsalis.org/discography/title/black-brown-and-beige)

The website boosts that it is “a definitive, present-day recording of the suite.” This is true. It is not an effort to recreate what BB&B might have sounded at Carnegie Hall in 1943 but give Ellington’s composition a fresh face.

It will be interesting to hear the reactions of the Ellington community to this.

The work was recorded during a live performance of the work by the Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis at Time Warner Center’s  Rose Theater at the end of April 2018. The conductor was Chris Crenshow – trombonist and saxophonist in JALCO.

Some excerpts of the recording is available on YouTube like this one with Work Song.

The recording is available on most digital streaming platforms like Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music and Deezer. A mp3 version costs around 10 euros on Amazon. It is also available in a high resolution format (24 bits/96 kHz). For those living in the E.U. the easiest is to buy this version at http://www.highresaudio.com. It costs 15 euros.

 

DESS Bulletin – The Winter Issue

It might not be winter yet but the new issue of the DESS Bulletin was sent to its subscribers = the DESS members yesterday. As usual a lot of good reading thanks to the energetic work of Bo Haufman.

Elmer Snowden is the featured artist this time.

“Was he really an Ellingtonian,” asks Bo and gives an affirmative answer in a detailed and well-researched article. The focus is of course on Snowden’s collaboration with Duke Ellington but other aspects of Snowden’s career are also well covered.

Another article by Bo Haufman deals with Duke Ellington’s “occasional” vocalists i.e. the well-known 1920’s and 1930’s vocalists who Irving Mills paired with Ellington in recording sessions. Bo maps this group, gives short biographies and the songs recorded.

From Bo’s pen comes also an article about the Juan Tizol-Duke Ellington composition Congo Brava. NDESOR lists only two recordings of the song. Bo is puzzled by this and reflect on it in the article. He also quotes what Eddie Lambert and Gunther Schuller has written about it  and refer the reader to an article by Lawrence Gushee in the Ellington Reader.

Mike Zirpolo’s contribution to the new Bulletin is an article about Morning Glory. It is a reprint from his website Swing & Beyond, where it was originally published in December last year. It was among the songs recorded by Ellington on his first session for Victor in 1940. He is credited as the composer but it is apparently Rex Stewart who composed it. The article tells the story of how the rights got into Ellington’s hands.

Another find by Bo for reprint in the Bulletin is the part about Ellington in the diary Spike Hughes kept during his visit to New York in1933. It paints an interesting picture not so much of Ellington as of Hughes.

In addition to these articles, the new Bulletin reports from the DESS meeting on 16 September and reviews of Jack Chambers new book Sweet Thunder – Duke Ellington’s Music in Nine Themes as well as Storyville’s CD with Ellington’s concert in Uppsala in 1971. It also has the program of the upcoming Ellington conference in Washington D.C. in March next year.

 

 

 

 

Autumn 2019 Issue of DESS Bulletin

The new Bulletin with a lot of good reading was sent out to DESS members a couple of days ago.

Betty Roché is the featured artist this time.

Bo Haufman has written the main article about her. For him she is Duke’s “unforgettable vocalist”. The article is supplemented by a discography of Betty Roché outside the Ellington organization.

The second installment of Nigel Haslewood’s article about Al Sears is also another major read in the new Bulletin.

Two well-known Ellington compositions – Rocks In My Bed and Mood Indigo – are presented in separate articles. From his website “Swing and Beyond” Mike Zirpolo has contributed the article on Rocks In My Bed while the one about Mood Indigo is written by Bo Haufman.

He has also contributed an article about Frank Sebastian’s Cotton Club in Culver City in Los Angeles. In later incarnations it is also known as Casa Mañana and Meadowbrook Gardens Café.

The new Bulletin also reprints (with some changes) Anders Asplund’s article about Duke Ellington’s concert in Storvik on April 23, 1939, which  was published on the DESS website last year.

In addition to all this, readers can find in information about the 2020 Duke Ellington Conference in Washington D.C. and a review of a DVD with one of Ellington’s last concerts in the next to last issue of  DESS Bulletin for 2019.

 

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