DUKE ELLINGTON SOCIETY OF SWEDEN

Hem » Duke Ellington Study Group conferences

Kategoriarkiv: Duke Ellington Study Group conferences

Categories for posts

Extended Ellington (2)

On June 24 – just before the summer break – we published the first part of ”The Extended Ellington” concert, which ended the third day of the Ellington ’88 conference.

The second part of the concert starts with what is the ”world premiere performance” of The Queen’s Suite. It refers to the fact that this is the first public performance ever of the suite.

It took another 14 years before there was a second public performance took place. In 2012 during the Diamond Jubilee of the reign of Queen Elisabeth II, the Echoes of Harlem orchestra played it at the Marlborough International Jazz Festival.

At the fourth day of Ellington ’88, Roger Boyes talked about the Duke meeting the Queens in Leeds in 1958 and his memories from Ellington’s performances there. It can be heard here.

After a break, the orchestra continues with ”Black, Brown and Beige”. Alan Cohen steps in as guest conductor and June Norton is vocalist.

The concert ends with a swinging Stompy Jones with Bill Berry, Buster Cooper, Jimmy Woode, Sam Woodyard, Alice Babs, Herb Jeffries and others joining in. A good way to end another succesful Ellington conference!

And it also marks the end of the series of articles on Ellington ’88 in Oldham.

Brian Priestly on BB&B

In 1974, Brian Priestly – jazz writer and pianist among other things – and the arranger and composer Alan Cohen wrote what Mark Tucker has labelled ”the first serious analytical article on Black, Brown and Beige”.

In the early 1970’s, they spent considerable time listening to and transcribing several recordings of the suite and they also studied a score published by Tempo Music.

Their work was the basis for the recording of BB&B, which Alan Cohen did with his orchestra in 1972.

Having acquired a very detailed knowledge of the suite, they were able to write an article which Tucker has characterized as a ”densely detailed, section-by section discussion” with ”special attention to Ellington’s thematic treatment and unifying techniques”.

The article was originally commissioned by the British ”Jazz & Blues” magazine but finally published in ”Composer” – the bulletin of the Composers Guild of Great Britain. A reprint of it is included in The Duke Ellington Reader.

At the Ellington ’88 conference in Oldham, Brian Priestly revisited Black, Brown and Beige.

The Ellington Orchestra ended its ”Extended Ellington” concert on the third day of the conference with a performance of the work. For the occasion, Alan Cohen took over as guest conductor and he brought in Brian Priestly to play the piano as he had done when Cohen  recorded the suite in 1972.

In the afternoon before the concert, Priestly shared his analysis of and view on the work with the conference participants. It is a presentation not to be missed.

The performance of the BB&B at Ellington ’88 will be available on the website on September 28.

Birmingham 2018

The website published a first short report on the Ellington 2018 conference in a Bits and Pieces article on May 30. This month we will publish some more snapshots. The new issue of the Bulletin has a full and detailed article about the conference.

The Ellington Orchestra had a central role in the conference. This band composed of students from the Jazz Department of the Royal Conservatory and led by Jeremyn Price played concerts every day.

There was even an afternoon jamsessions with members of the band and conference participants. Here Brian Priestly is sitting in at the piano.

In the first evening’s concert, the orchestra played among other Ellington standards Black and Tan Fantasy.

The first concert in the second evening was titled ”Live at the Chicago Blue Note 1959”.

Here is most of this concert.

Ellington ’89 in Washington D.C. (6)

In their conference folders, the participants in Ellington ’89 found an invitation to a very special event.

The Washington jazz broadcaster and Ellington aficionado Felix Grant had spent a lot of time and energy to find Ellington’s birthplace in Washington D.C. Once he had found it, he lobbied hard the U.S. Congress and local authorities to have a memorial plaque installed on the site.

Finally, he got what he had strived for and on the last day of the conference, the plaque was unveiled.

Despite some cancellations, the conference participants could also enjoy presentations and music during the last day of the conference.

The first speaker of the day was Dr. Jerome  Sashen, who provided a ”Psychoanalysis of Ellington’s Music”.

In the afternoon, Sjef Hoefsmit did a presentation on ”Ellington’s Train” A soundfile of the presentation was included in the first article on the conference. Here is the video version.

He was followed by Don Miller, President of the Chicago Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society and one of the instagators of the Ellington conferences. He gave a brief presentation on what was available at that time of Ellington’s music on CD. He had found that some 75 CDs of this kind had been issued at the time!

The Danish jazz researcher and jazz critic Erik Wiedeman was the last speaker at the conference. His topic was ”Ellington in Denmark” and the presentation included a lot of musical examples.

Part of the afternoon was also a concert – ”Program of Ellington’s Music” – with Ronnie Wells and her students from the University of Maryland.

The DESS member Peter Lee was the only Swedish participant at the conference. Also Alice Babs and her husband Nils were there but they were considered as Spanish.

Peter remembers that he thought that the organization of the conference could have been better since almost a quater of the scheduled speakers never appeared. But there were a lot of good things and Peter remembers particularily

  1. The day at the Smithsonian. Besides the presentations, he was happy to be able to see the documentation on Ellington’s Honorary Membership of the Swedish Royal Academy of Music.
  2. Among the presentations, Peter rembers the one by Sjef Hoefsmit’s on ”Ellington´s Trains” as the best. ”It was very well structed and very thourough”, he says.
  3. The unveiling of the Memorial Plaque on the site where Ellington was also ”quite special” and so was the ”lunch afterwards with only me and Alice Babs. She wanted to have the opportunity to speak some Swedish”.
  4. The big band concert with Jimmy Hamilton and Herb Jeffries.

The full text of Peter’s comments in Swedish is in the Washington 1989 part of the Ellington Archive.

This is the last article in the Ellington ’89 series. The DESS website likes to thank in particular Ted Hudson and Peter Lee for help with photos and Ted and Bob Reny for help with contacts in Washington D.C.

 

 

 

Ellington ’89 in Washington D.C. (5)

The second day of the conference ended with a concert by Doug Richard’s Great American Music Ensemble. It provided the audience with ”A Panorama of Ellington’s Music From The Late 20’s To The Late 50’s”. As an extra bonus, Jimmy Hamilton and Herb Jeffries appeared as guest artists and made the concert a very special and memorable event of the conference.

The orchestra, also known under its acronym GAME,  was formed in the mid-80s when Richards was director of Jazz Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. It made a recording of standards from the Great American Songbook in 2001 but it was only released in 2016 on the Jazzed Media label.

Here is the full two-and-a-half hour concert (except for the very end, which will be published on April 29).

 

Besides the presentations included in the previous article on the conference, there were two more on the second day.

Dr. Ted Hudson – active member of Chapter 90 and much more – gave a presentation on ”Literary Sources For Ellington’s Music”.

It ends with a filmed performance of a song – ”Heart of Harlem” – that Ellington and Langston Hughes apparently wrote together. Ellington copyrighted it in 1945.

And Dr. Joseph McLaren talked about ”Ellington’s Afro-American Heritage”.

 

 

Ellington ’89 in Washington D.C. (4)

The second day of the conference also had a very full program.

and the President of Chapter 90 of the Ellington Society, Terrell Allen,  guided the audience through it with firm hands but also with a lot of jokes.

It started with the handing over of the Eddie Lambert gavel and some welcoming words.

Then Jerry Valburn asked Sjef Hoefsmit, Klaus Strateman, Gordon Ewing and ”the young man” Steven Lasker to join him at the podium for a discussion on ongoing research about Ellington.

 

The full video of the panel discussion is in Ellington Archive

Kurt Dietrich from Ripon College in Ripon, Wisconsin then took the floor. He came to the conference to tell about his PhD work on Lawrence Brown and to get some feed-back from the Ellington specialists gathered at the conference.

Follwing his doctoral dissertation and a number of journal articles, he published in 1999 his book, Duke’s ’Bones: Ellington’s Great Trombonists. It was follwed 10 years later by another book on a similar topic Jazz ’Bones: The World of Jazz Trombone. Both are highly recommended!

Another speaker during the second day was Andrew Homzy from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada –  musicologist, arranger, big band leader, Duke Ellington as well as Charlie Mingus specialist and much more. He was a well-known profile at many Ellington Study Group conferences and is still an important part of the international network of Ellington aficionados and specialists.

This time he talked about Ellington’s La Plus Belle Africane.

Two other speakers during the second day were Bruce Kennan, member of the New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society, and Martin Williams.

The topic for Kennan’s presentation was ”Spoken Ellington” and he let the the audience listen to excerpts from a number of Ellington interviews.

Martin Williams spoke about ”Stealing from the Duke” and made his point with musical examples.

The other presentations from the second day of the Washington ’89 conference will be included in a later article together with some from the third day.

The day ended with a concert by Doug Richard’s The Great Americ Music Ensemble, which gave a panorama of Ellington’s music from the late 20’s to the late 50’s. Here is a tidbit from the concert. The full one will be included in the next article.

 

 

 

 

Stockholm 1994 (8)

This is the final part of videos from the Ellington ’94 conference in Stockholm.

At the end of the first day, Professor Ted Hudson, at that time vice-president of the Washington D.C. Chapter of Duke Ellington Society, gave a presentation on Ellington’s childhood in Washington D.C. In it, he depicted the cultural, religious and racial environment, in which Ellington grew up.

On the last day, Walter van de Leur – the Billy Strayhorn specialist and nowadays professor Jazz and Improvised Music at the University of Amsterdam – gave his first Ellington conference presentation on his research work on Billy Strayhorn. He would give presentations on this topic at many other Ellington conferences and academic musicologist gatherings.

Also Dr. John Edward Hasse, Curator of American Music at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C., took the stage the last day. His topic was ”Ellington Storms Sweden” and he presented press and and public reactions to Ellington’s Swedish and European tour in 1939. He also talked about the work of his department at the Smithsonian to preserve the legacy of Ellington and sold many copies of his book ”Beyond Categories – The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington”, which had been published in 1993.

And then, after three full days of presentations, concerts and social mingling, it was time to thank the organizers, say good-bye and announce Ellington ’95.

 

%d bloggare gillar detta: