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Brian Priestly on Duke – The Pianist

Brian Priestly was also one of the speakers at the Ellington ’92 conference in Copenhagen.

Photo Bjarne Busk

He talked about ”Ellington The Pianist”.

During the 45 minutes presentation, Priestly played eight Ellington recordings with the piano at the centre and used them to highlight different aspects of Ellington’s piano playing. From time to time, he also sat down at the piano to give emphasis to his comments.

The music played in the program was Rockin’ in Rhythm (1937), Melancholia (1953), See See Rider (1972), (I’m Riding On the Moon and) Dancing on the Stars (1938), Band Call (1954), The Clothed Woman(1947), Bang Up Blues(1950) and Body and Soul (1961)

 

 

 

Ellington ’92 in Copenhagen (3)

Another theme of the Copenhagen conference was ”Remembering Duke”, which allowed speakers to share the memories of Duke and experiences from working with him.

The first speaker on this theme was Leonard Feather, who of course had a lot to tell about his memories of Duke but also about himself.

Feather’s presentation also gave those, who has never heard Ellington sing, the opportunity to do so and also to hear Cootie Williams play trombone.

After his presentation, Feather called Clark Terry and Rolf Ericson onto stage to be interviewed about their times in the Ellington orchestra. It is a relaxed interview which gave the audience many laughs.

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The presentation of the Ellington biographer Austin H. Lawrence on Ellington’s England 1933 tour also falls in the category of ”remembering”.

At one point  Luis Russell – the small big band leader – had told him that one of the most important things that happened to Duke was when he went to England. ”He was a different man when he came back”, Russel said.

So for Lawrence ”the trip to England helped Ellington grow” and this is the focus of his presentation.

 

 

Ellington ’92 in Copenhagen (2)

The Danish bass player and radioman Erik Moseholm was another speaker on this theme. His topic was the Danish bass tradition and the inspiration of Ellington’s basists on it. He talked about the guitarist/basist Niels Foss the first major Danish bass player, Oscar Pettiford, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen and of course about himself. The classical bass teacher Oscar Hegner and his 4-finger-technique features also prominently in the presentation.

Moseholm’s presentation was followed by a live demonstration by two – at that time – young Danish bass players, Jesper Lundgaard and Mads Vinding. Unfortunately, the performance was not recorded, presumably for copyright reasons.

Another major theme for the conference was ”The Passing on of The Ellington Tradition”.

Stanley Crouch was the first speaker on this theme. In his presentation ”The Temporary Significance of Duke Ellington” he talked a lot about the early roots of jazz and placed Ellington in this context.

It was followed by a panel discussion, in which Crouch participated together with Andrew Homzy, Peter Watrous and Erik Wiedeman. The topic of the panel was Recreating Ellington – Problems and Rewards.

The chairman of the panel, Dan Morgenstern, asked it to focus on ”to what extent is it possible to create/recreate Ellington’s music”. He also brought in the issue: ”How can Ellington’s legacy  best be used in today’s jazz”.

This led to an interesting discussion with comments with relevance also today.

Ellington ’92 in Copenhagen (1)

The 10th Ellington Study Group Conference took place in Copenhagen May 28-31, 1992.

The lead organisers of the conference were Arnvid Meyer, Niels Toft and Karl Emil Knudsen – three leading figures in the Danish jazz and Ellington community. They organised the conference together with the recently founded ”The Scandinavian Duke Ellington Society – Danish Chapter”.

It followed in the path of previous Ellington conferences and offered an ambitious program mixing musical events and presentations.

The full program is here.

Unfortunately only recordings of the presentations are available and they are sound recording made by the organisers. It seems as if Benny Åslund, who attended the conference, did some filming but the videos have not been found so far.

Photo Bjarne Busk

Bjarne Busk was one of the participants in the conference. He remembers it as ”a serious one, with a lot of information, and a lot of music”.

”On the first day of the conference, nine jazzclubs in Copenhagen had organized concerts and sessions linked to the conference and the conference participants had got 2 tickets to use how they liked.

At one of the places Mercer Ellington conducted a fine Danish big band. I also remember the closing dance with groups of musicians, including Buster Cooper and Clark Terry, and some with the great swedes Rolf Billberg, Arne Domnerus and Rolf Ericson.”

Bo Haufman was another participants. He was one of the first to register for the conference. ”I was actually the third one to do so”, he says. ”The Falconer Center in Copenhagen was the conference venue and it was absolutely perfect for this.

Leonard Feather is one of the presenters Bo remembers particularly well. ”He started his presentation by saying ”Duke is not dead”

”It was also very interesting to hear Erik Moseholm presentation about the inspiration of Ellington’s bass player to the Danish Bass Tradition bearing in mind that Denmark is known for its excellent bass player.”

”Among the many musical events, I remember in particular a concert by Arne Domnérus och Bengt Hallberg, says Bo also. ”They had composed a special number called  ”Jazz Å Du”.

Arnvid Meyer chaired the first session of the conference.

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One angle in the program was Ellington in Denmark.  Erik Wiedemann – Mr. Jazz in Denmark – was the first presenter on this theme. He talked about four Danish jazz recording with a strong Ellington influence.

The first one was Copenhagen Rhapsody played by the leading Danish big band in the early 30’s led by Erik Tuxen. Then Wiedemann gave the audience first a recording by a piano-bass combo with Borge Roger Henrichsen and Niels Foss, which played Preludium in C followed by Donkey Party played by a band led by Leo Mathisen. Both of them from the early 1940’s when Denmark was under occupation.

Wiedeman’s last example was actually a 1990 recording of an Ellington composition – The Mooche – but played in avant-guard way by Pierre Dørge & New Jungle Orchestra.

 

 

Extended Ellington (2)

On June 24 – just before the summer break – we published the first part of ”The Extended Ellington” concert, which ended the third day of the Ellington ’88 conference.

The second part of the concert starts with what is the ”world premiere performance” of The Queen’s Suite. It refers to the fact that this is the first public performance ever of the suite.

It took another 14 years before there was a second public performance took place. In 2012 during the Diamond Jubilee of the reign of Queen Elisabeth II, the Echoes of Harlem orchestra played it at the Marlborough International Jazz Festival.

At the fourth day of Ellington ’88, Roger Boyes talked about the Duke meeting the Queens in Leeds in 1958 and his memories from Ellington’s performances there. It can be heard here.

After a break, the orchestra continues with ”Black, Brown and Beige”. Alan Cohen steps in as guest conductor and June Norton is vocalist.

The concert ends with a swinging Stompy Jones with Bill Berry, Buster Cooper, Jimmy Woode, Sam Woodyard, Alice Babs, Herb Jeffries and others joining in. A good way to end another succesful Ellington conference!

And it also marks the end of the series of articles on Ellington ’88 in Oldham.

Brian Priestly on BB&B

In 1974, Brian Priestly – jazz writer and pianist among other things – and the arranger and composer Alan Cohen wrote what Mark Tucker has labelled ”the first serious analytical article on Black, Brown and Beige”.

In the early 1970’s, they spent considerable time listening to and transcribing several recordings of the suite and they also studied a score published by Tempo Music.

Their work was the basis for the recording of BB&B, which Alan Cohen did with his orchestra in 1972.

Having acquired a very detailed knowledge of the suite, they were able to write an article which Tucker has characterized as a ”densely detailed, section-by section discussion” with ”special attention to Ellington’s thematic treatment and unifying techniques”.

The article was originally commissioned by the British ”Jazz & Blues” magazine but finally published in ”Composer” – the bulletin of the Composers Guild of Great Britain. A reprint of it is included in The Duke Ellington Reader.

At the Ellington ’88 conference in Oldham, Brian Priestly revisited Black, Brown and Beige.

The Ellington Orchestra ended its ”Extended Ellington” concert on the third day of the conference with a performance of the work. For the occasion, Alan Cohen took over as guest conductor and he brought in Brian Priestly to play the piano as he had done when Cohen  recorded the suite in 1972.

In the afternoon before the concert, Priestly shared his analysis of and view on the work with the conference participants. It is a presentation not to be missed.

The performance of the BB&B at Ellington ’88 will be available on the website on September 28.

Birmingham 2018

The website published a first short report on the Ellington 2018 conference in a Bits and Pieces article on May 30. This month we will publish some more snapshots. The new issue of the Bulletin has a full and detailed article about the conference.

The Ellington Orchestra had a central role in the conference. This band composed of students from the Jazz Department of the Royal Conservatory and led by Jeremyn Price played concerts every day.

There was even an afternoon jamsessions with members of the band and conference participants. Here Brian Priestly is sitting in at the piano.

In the first evening’s concert, the orchestra played among other Ellington standards Black and Tan Fantasy.

The first concert in the second evening was titled ”Live at the Chicago Blue Note 1959”.

Here is most of this concert.

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